Denture Care

Proper cleaning of dentures

Improperly cleaned dentures can accumulate denture plaque, which is seen as a reservoir for pathogens1,2. Pathogens, in combination with other risk factors, may be associated with oral and systemic diseases1,3-5.

Many denture wearers are not cleaning their dentures properly. In fact, many denture wearers use regular toothpaste to clean their dentures. While toothpaste is good for natural teeth, it is not good for denture material, which can be ten times softer than tooth enamel. Toothpaste contains abrasives that scratch dentures, leaving microscopic crevices where bacteria can collect and grow. It is therefore important for denture wearers to clean their dentures properly.

Management

Dental professionals should advise their patients to clean their dentures or partials daily in an antibacterial denture cleanser such as Polident with Microclean. First the denture should soak in the solution for the time duration indicated by package instructions. Then the denture should be brushed gently with a soft-bristled tooth or denture brush, to help remove any remaining debris. Then the denture should be rinsed thoroughly. Of course the patient should also be encouraged to use regular toothpaste on remaining natural teeth, as well as dental floss, mouthwash, etc.

Adhesives

Even though 86% of denture wearers describe their dentures as well-fitting, trapped food particles are still the # 1 complaint among denture wearers6. These trapped food particles are more than just an annoyance - they can cause serious pain and irritation. In addition to the physical pain, trapped food particles can lead to a decrease in satisfaction and overall denture wearing experience. And with the challenging transition to life with dentures, these added stressors can become overwhelming to denture patients.

Management

Dental professionals can guide patients in proper care for dentures, and help improve their overall denture wearing experience. Patients should be advised to apply denture adhesive once per day to help seal out food particles. To prevent oozing, patients should first try a SMALL amount, and then use more if needed. It may take a few tries to find the right amount.

Living Well with Dentures

New denture wearers need your help

Although dental professionals deal with patients' tooth loss and dentures everyday, adjusting to life with dentures can present huge challenges for the 49 million adults in America who wear full or partial dentures.

It's quite natural for patients to feel a little apprehensive or overwhelmed when considering full or partial dentures. Tooth loss and adjusting to wearing dentures can be a life changing event for patients. Many patients need help with their transition to dentures but may not know who to turn to or what to ask.

New denture wearers need your help

Although dental professionals deal with patients' tooth loss and dentures everyday, adjusting to life with dentures can present huge challenges for the 49 million adults in America who wear full or partial dentures.

It's quite natural for patients to feel a little apprehensive or overwhelmed when considering full or partial dentures. Tooth loss and adjusting to wearing dentures can be a life changing event for patients. Many patients need help with their transition to dentures but may not know who to turn to or what to ask.

 

Dental practitione

Dental practitioners need support

Helping patients through the denture journey can present a real challenge for the dental professional. That's why we have developed the Policare Program - a helping hand for both you and your patients through the denture journey. The Policare program helps to bridge the gap between the new denture wearer and the dental professional, and offers ongoing support and information. You and your patients can access a range of support materials by simply clicking here.

References:

  1. Sumi Y, Hiroko M, Michiwaki Y, Nagosa S, Nagaya M. Colonization of dental plaque by respiratory pathogens in dependent elderly. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2007; 44(2):119-124.
  2. Scannapieco FA, Stewart EM, Mylotte JM. Colonization of dental plaque by respiratory pathogens in medical intensive care patients. Crit Care Med. 1992; 20(6):740-745.
  3. Coulthwaite L, Verran J. Potential pathogenic aspects of denture plaque. Br J Biomed Sci. 2007; 64(4):180-189.
  4. Yoon MN, Steele CM. The oral care imperative: the link between oral hygiene and aspiration pneumonia. Top Geriatr Rehabil. 2007; 23(3):280-288.
  5. Darjani AS, Taubert K, Wilson W, et al. Prevention of bacterial endocarditis. Circulation. 1997; 96:358-366. et al, Int J Prosthodont 2006; 19: 294-8.
  6. Canadian denture care quality of life research; 2005.

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